Just as a point of discussion. What would it cost to

SPB
[subject]
Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 17:21 (133 days ago)

manufacture a Colt Python in today’s world?

mega bucks. Plus it couldn't be a real Python as

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 17:51 (133 days ago) @ SPB

Colt still has a patent on that. Plus it probably wouldn't sell. Collectors want an original Python in mint condition. A newly made Python wouldn't be as popular nor as strong as many other guns on the market. It wouldn't handle the hot magnum ammo that the S&W 686, Ruger GP-100 and so on are handling today. I would bet it would be a terrible flop. None of the younger shooters would want one.

As a "for instance" a person could bring back the original '57 Chevy and I bet it would flop. Who wants to drive a non power steering vehicle with roll down windows and no AC? Plus a push button AM radio. I drive an '86 Bronco with none of the fancy digital stuff and a carburetor with points and plugs. Ever try to find a mechanic that works on a vehicle like that. Almost impossible.

People are people. They like to think about the old stuff they grew up with but going out and buying one is a different thing. My personal opinion and $11.25 will buy you a cup of coffee at Starbucks.

Personally I never cared for the Python

Jim Taylor
[subject]
Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 18:04 (133 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

I was always more of a single action guy. Or a 1911 ....

How do you feel about the Colt

Larry Fry
[subject]
Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 20:08 (133 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

Anaconda in .44 mag or .45?

not Jim, but the Anaconda was recalled a couple of times by

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 22:09 (133 days ago) @ Larry Fry

Colt for accuracy problems. I don't know if they ever got it fixed or not. I wouldn't want one. The name Colt hasn't meant quality in quite a few years. My personal opinion again.

THEY DID. S&W CONTACTED ME

JT
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 06:00 (133 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

TO ASK HOW I GOT MY .44 ANA TO SHOOT SO WELL.

did you tell them the main thing was knowing how to shoot?

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 10:22 (133 days ago) @ JT

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PLUS A NEW BARREL

JT
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 11:45 (133 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

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They were never the gun that the S&W is.

Jim Taylor
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 05:46 (133 days ago) @ Larry Fry

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FITZ WHO WAS MR. COLT BETWEEN

JT
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 06:01 (133 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

THE TOW WORLD WARS ADMITTED PRIVATELY TO BOB NICHOLS THAT THE SMITH WAS THE BETTER GUN.

My Dad - who was a great double-action man

Jim Taylor
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 06:25 (133 days ago) @ JT

felt the same way. Using them hard the Smith was much better.

I agree. I have a bunch of Smiths and no Colt wheel guns.

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 10:23 (133 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

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I purchased several colts while I was

Grover Sr
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 11:46 (133 days ago) @ Larry Fry

On active duty in Europe back in the 70's because sometimes they were all that were available on base gun clubs. Had a 6" Python, 6" Trooper MK III and a 2" detective special. Both the Python and MK III had timing issues. The Detective was extremely off in alignment. At 10 yards, from a pistol rest, it shot 18" to the left. Ended up sending all three in for warranty work, the Detective was considered "within tolerances for accuracy by Colt". I never bought another Colt handgun again.

Personnaly the only wheel guns

Da Duke
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 13:26 (132 days ago) @ SPB

Thant have not given me any trouble were Dan Wessons and Rugers. Not saying they didn't have problems. Never owned a Colt and don't want to. Why buy an expensive S&W when you can have 2 Rugers. JMHO

each brand of revolvers have their own good points and

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 15:07 (132 days ago) @ Da Duke

not so good points. The Python got it's reputation back in the '50s and was called the Cadillac of revolvers, a name I am sure Colt got started. S&W had their law enforcement contracts and their great model 10 was king of the cop guns. S&W had introduced their Model 27 years earlier but it has a sort of cult following. Their Model 29 in 44 mag came out and was accepted by handgun hunters like Al Goerg in the early '60s and a few others. Most others thought it was too much gun. At the time the Python was still the smoothest double action revolver going.

As the '70s hit, Dirty Harry changed everything. The model 29 in 44 Magnum was king and everybody wanted one. The Python was pretty much ignored. Colt had a chance to put out a big frame 44 but their inept management decided not to. They had the big frame and the knowledge but passed on it.

The model 29 was so popular they were going for 2 and 3 times retail. Other companies were bringing the 44 magnum out to fill in. Even High Standard brought out their Crusader in 44 Magnum although they were few and far between. Dan Wesson was another great double action 44 Magnum so shooters and hunters had a good selection. A lot of handgunners were grabbing the single actions like the super smooth old model Ruger Super Blackhawk in 44 magnum. Colt still languished on the sidelines with their Python, that nobody wanted. Handgun hunters opted for the much stronger S&W model 27 instead of the weaker sister Colt.

In '76 the silhouette game was getting started and again Colt lagged behind with their fragile Python. The silhouette game required strong guns and the S&Ws were king in the double action while Ruger held first place in the single action group. The Auto Mags were getting started, in fact the first major silhouette match was put on by Lee Jurras to promote the Auto Mag. So now people had lots of choices. And still Colt was sitting on their thumbs on the sidelines.

In the early '80s Ruger brought out the Redhawk in 44 magnum and that was the last nail in the coffin for Colt. They tried to get the magnum shooters back in their corner with the Anaconda which didn't do well at all. As John Taffin said, they shot great, if you put a new barrel on them and waved a magic wand over them, but again it was too little, too late for Colt. Several bankruptcys and new ownerships were in Colt's future and their products got less and less in demand. Their bread and butter was in their military M-16 contracts and they could care less about the revolvers in their line up.

Anyway, that was the tale as I saw it from a gun shop owner and custom gun maker's prospective.

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