Now I know why action wrenches are so expensive.

WB
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 11:47 (183 days ago)

I got an idea I'd just make me a action wrench that takes inserts for S&W, N and K frames, Ruger BH, maybe Single Six etc. Several folks make them. The wrench itself is simple, a little welding for the handle receiver threads for long or short handles.

A more simplified design than this but the same spirit.
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So I get me some hi-density Nylon, 12" stick 2X2". I figure I can cut it into 6" sections, then split that, maybe split that again. Pretty good idea. I can end by milling the openings then splitting the blocks to fit around the action. But boy howdy is this stuff tough. I tried a table saw, saws-all, grinding, and finally had some sweaty success with a hand hack saw. I need a bandsaw, maybe that would do, the dremel small bandsaw would be good maybe a scroll saw. The stuff heats up to fast and melts. At slow speeds (hand saw) and fine blade teeth it seems to chip and cut OK. Man is it work though. I could have just bought the stuff for $200-300. Luckily my labor is cheap, life is an adventure.

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Try UHMW

Randy Barnett
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 11:51 (183 days ago) @ WB

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My hampster is pooped, the acronym?

WB
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 13:00 (183 days ago) @ Randy Barnett

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Uh...Ultra High Molecular Wood?

WB
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 13:34 (183 days ago) @ WB

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Ultra High Molecular Weight polyethylene

Randy Barnett
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 16:58 (183 days ago) @ WB

Very tough and easy to machine.

I deal with a great company called USPlastics

WB
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 18:30 (182 days ago) @ Randy Barnett

The story of the Christian founder is fantastic and he will give you a free book. They have many materials I bet that one too. They can be expensive. It's sold by the foot (usually a 2x2"? and in 3-4' sticks. I lucked out and got this Nylon in a 1' piece. It will produce (8) potential frame blocks.

I tried a Fly-cutter to no avail but an end mill worked well, just a lot of passes.

back a hundred years ago before I got smart and bought the

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 12:13 (183 days ago) @ WB

right tools for the job, I made one out of a real dense wood. It was just the head that holds the barrel and put in a large heavy vise. I had 2 or 3 different heads of different sizes for different size barrels. It worked for a year or so of using it 3 or 4 times a week. Finally I bought one of the big free standing hydraulic presses that is a standing piece of equipment which needs very little muscle to do the job.
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We use it several times a day and it sure makes things easier and does not scratch or damage the gun. You can get a small one for less than $200 from Harbor Freight. Then cut the wood into the right size for the barrels and you are set.

We have a harbor freight model in the shop now bough it last

WB
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 12:59 (183 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

week for $175. I've not used it yet but that would be the ticket. We bought it to rebuild a big mixer gear drive motor. Kicked the can down the road for a total replacement probably another 5-10 yrs. Replacement will likely cost well over $200,000. We rebuilt it in house for about $3k.


I'm just playing around learning things. Some good dried Red Oak blocks would do well I figure. I still have to clamp the barrel in the vice. I have some aluminum but will likely use wood for now.

the wood holds just as good as aluminum or

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 13:02 (183 days ago) @ WB

steel blocks and will do less damage to the barrel, plus is easily replaced when it wears out. And is easy to work with.

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